Econometrica: Jan 2007, Volume 75, Issue 1

Experimental Analysis of Neighborhood Effects

https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0262.2007.00733.x
p. 83-119

Jeffrey R Kling, Jeffrey B Liebman, Lawrence F Katz

Families, primarily female‐headed minority households with children, living in high‐poverty public housing projects in five U.S. cities were offered housing vouchers by lottery in the Moving to Opportunity program. Four to seven years after random assignment, families offered vouchers lived in safer neighborhoods that had lower poverty rates than those of the control group not offered vouchers. We find no significant overall effects of this intervention on adult economic self‐sufficiency or physical health. Mental health benefits of the voucher offers for adults and for female youth were substantial. Beneficial effects for female youth on education, risky behavior, and physical health were offset by adverse effects for male youth. For outcomes that exhibit significant treatment effects, we find, using variation in treatment intensity across voucher types and cities, that the relationship between neighborhood poverty rate and outcomes is approximately linear.

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Supplemental Material

Supplementary Material for "Experimental Analysis of Neighborhood Effects"

This directory contains the stata do-files used to generate the results presented in "Experimental Analysis of Neighborhood Effects" by Jeffrey Kling, Jeffrey Liebman,and Lawrence Katz. The names of the do-files correspond to the figures and tables in the paper. (The data is not publicly available, in order to preserve the confidentiality of the respondents.  See readme file).

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Supplementary Material for "Experimental Analysis of Neighborhood Effects"

This web appendix contains the following sections:B. Summary indices and mean effect sizesC. Calculation of adjusted p-valuesD. Comparison of outcomes to the National Longitudinal Survey of YouthE. Additional discussion of internal validityF. Additional results for adultsG. Additional results for youth

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